Music in
Films

1900 - 2000


Music in Films
 

Nino Rota
1911 - 1979

Nino Rota, (born December 31, 1911, Milan, Italy—died April 10, 1979, Rome), Italian composer of film scores. Rota had composed an oratorio and an opera by age 13. After studies at Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute he began writing film scores. From 1950 to 1978 he served as director of the Liceo Musicale, a conservatory in Bari. In 1950 he also began his long association with Federico Fellini, for whom he would score films such as La strada (1955), La dolce vita (1960), 81/2 (1963), and Amarcord (1973). He provided scores for many other films including Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather, Part II (1974).

1952 Lo sceicco bianco
1953 I vitelloni  
1953 L'Ennemi public n° 1  
1954 La strada 
1955 Il bidone    
1956 War and Peace
1957 Le notti bianche
1957 Le notti di Cabiria
1958 The Law Is the Law   
1959 La grande guerra 
1960 Plein soleil 
1960 La dolce vita   
1960 Rocco e i suoi fratelli   
1962 Boccaccio '70
1963 Il Gattopardo
1963 8½ (Otto e mezzo) 
1965 Giulietta degli spiriti  
1967 The Taming of the Shrew 
1968 Romeo and Juliet
1969 Fellini – Satyricon
1971 I clowns

1972 Roma  
1972 The Godfather     
1973 Amarcord 
1974 The Godfather Part II
1976 Il Casanova di Federico Fellini
1978 Prova d'orchestra
1978 Death on the Nile
1990 The Godfather Part III (Carmine Coppola Music Score)

Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and film composer. He was a central figure in the New Hollywood wave of filmmaking.

After directing The Rain People (1969), he co-wrote the 1970 film Patton, earning the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay along with co-writer Edmund H. North. His directorial prominence was cemented with the release in 1972 of The Godfather, a film which revolutionized movie-making in the gangster genre, earning praise from both critics and the public before winning three Academy Awards—including his second Oscar (Best Adapted Screenplay, with Mario Puzo), Best Picture, and his first nomination for Best Director.

He followed with The Godfather Part II in 1974, which became the first sequel to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Highly regarded by critics, it brought him three more Academy Awards: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Director and Best Picture, and made him the second director, after Billy Wilder, to be honored three times for the same film. The Conversation, which he directed, produced and wrote, was released that same year, winning the Palme d'Or at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival. He next directed 1979's Apocalypse Now. While notorious for its lengthy and strenuous production, the film is widely acclaimed for its vivid depiction of the Vietnam War. It won the Palme d'Or at the 1979 Cannes Film Festival, making Coppola one of only eight filmmakers to win two Palme d'Or awards.

While a number of Coppola's ventures in the 1980s and 1990s were critically lauded, he has never quite achieved the same commercial success with films as in the 1970s. His most well-known films released since the start of the 1980s are the dramas The Outsiders and Rumble Fish (both 1983), the crime-drama The Cotton Club (1984), the crime-drama The Godfather Part III (1990), and the horror film Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992).

The Godfather
 

The Godfather is a 1972 American crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Albert S. Ruddy, based on Mario Puzo's best-selling novel of the same name. It stars Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as the leaders of a fictional New York crime family. The story, spanning 1945 to 1955, chronicles the family under the patriarch Vito Corleone (Brando), focusing on the transformation of Michael Corleone (Pacino) from reluctant family outsider to ruthless mafia boss.

Paramount Pictures obtained the rights to the novel for the price of $80,000, before it gained popularity. Studio executives had trouble finding a director; their first few candidates turned down the position. They and Coppola disagreed over who would play several characters, in particular, Vito and Michael. Filming took place on location, primarily around New York and in Sicily, and was completed ahead of schedule. The musical score was principally composed by Nino Rota, with additional pieces by Carmine Coppola.

The film was the highest-grossing film of 1972 and was for a time the highest-grossing film ever made. It won the Oscars for Best Picture, Best Actor (Brando) and Best Adapted Screenplay (for Puzo and Coppola). Its seven other Oscar nominations included Pacino, James Caan, Robert Duvall (Best Supporting Actor), and Coppola for Best Director.

The Godfather is widely regarded as one of the greatest films in world cinema and one of the most influential, especially in the gangster genre. It was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 1990, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" and is ranked the second-greatest film in American cinema (behind Citizen Kane) by the American Film Institute. It was followed by sequels The Godfather Part II (1974) and The Godfather Part III (1990).
 

The Godfather Part II is a 1974 American crime film produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a screenplay co-written with Mario Puzo, starring Al Pacino and Robert De Niro. Partially based on Puzo's 1969 novel The Godfather, the film is both sequel and prequel to The Godfather, presenting parallel dramas: one picks up the 1958 story of Michael Corleone (Pacino), the new Don of the Corleone crime family, protecting the family business in the aftermath of an attempt on his life; the prequel covers the journey of his father, Vito Corleone (De Niro), from his Sicilian childhood to the founding of his family enterprise in New York City.

The Godfather Part II opened to divided reviews from critics. Its reputation, however, improved rapidly and it soon became the subject of critical reevaluation. It was nominated for eleven Academy Awards, and became the first sequel to win for Best Picture. Its six Oscar wins included Best Director for Coppola, Best Supporting Actor for De Niro and Best Adapted Screenplay for Coppola and Puzo. Pacino won the BAFTA Award for Best Actor and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Both The Godfather Part II and its predecessor remain highly influential films, especially in the gangster genre, and the former has been reevaluated. In 1997, the American Film Institute ranked it as the 32nd-greatest film in American film history and it retained this position 10 years later. Some have deemed it superior to the 1972 original. It was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 1993, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

The Godfather Part III, a further sequel, was released in 1990.
 

The Godfather Part III is a 1990 American crime film written by Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola, and directed by Coppola. A sequel to The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather Part II (1974), it completes the story of Michael Corleone, a Mafia kingpin who attempts to legitimize his criminal empire. The film also includes fictionalized accounts of two real-life events: the 1978 death of Pope John Paul I and the Papal banking scandal of 1981–82, both linked to Michael Corleone's business affairs. The film stars Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire, and Andy García, and features Eli Wallach, Joe Mantegna, George Hamilton, Bridget Fonda, and Sofia Coppola. Music by  Carmine Coppola.

Coppola and Puzo preferred the title The Death of Michael Corleone, but Paramount Pictures found that unacceptable. Coppola stated that The Godfather series is two films and that The Godfather Part III is an epilogue. It received generally positive reviews, albeit less than the critical acclaim that the first two films received. It grossed $136,766,062 and was nominated for seven Academy Awards including the Academy Award for Best Picture.
 

Nino Rota - The Godfather Love Theme

Nino Rota - The Godfather Suite
The Danish National Symphony Orchestra 
Conductor: Sarah Hicks
Choirmaster: Edward Ananian-Cooper
Soprano: Christine Nonbo Andersen
Mezzo-soprano: Tuva Semmingsen
Saxophone, harmonica, flute: Hans Ulrik
Guitar, banjo, mandolin: Mads Kjølby
Host: Kristian Leth
Concertmaster: Christina Åstrand

Nino Rota - The Godfather II - Original Soundtrack
01."Main Title/The Immigrant" 0:00
02."New Carpet" 3:25
03."Kay" 5:21
04."Every Time I Look in Your Eyes/After the Party"  8:18
05."Vito and Abbandando"  10:52
06."Senza Mamma/Diuri-Ciuri/Napule Ve Salute" 13:29
07."Godfathers at Home" 16:04
08."Remember Vito Andolini" 18:37
09.'"Michael Comes Home" 21:28
10."Marcia Stilo Italiano" 23:45
11."Ninna Nanna a Michele" 25:45
12."Brothers Mourn" - 28:06
13."Murder of Don Fanucci"  31:28 
14."End Title" was blocked by Universal Music Group

The Godfather Part III - Soundtrack Suite - Carmine Coppola
Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1990). Composed and Conducted by Carmine Coppola, Original Themes by Nino Rota.
-00:00 = "Main Title"
-00:39 = "Marcia Religioso"
-02:10 = "Michael's Letter"
-03:20 = "The Immigrant (Love Theme From The Godfather Part III)"
-04:47 = "The Godfather Waltz"
-06:10 = "Altobello"
-07:52 = "The Godfather Intermezzo"
-09:59 = "Coda: The Godfather Finale"

The Godfather
 

The Godfather is a 1972 American crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Albert S. Ruddy, based on Mario Puzo's best-selling novel of the same name. It stars Marlon Brando and Al Pacino as the leaders of a fictional New York crime family. The story, spanning 1945 to 1955, chronicles the family under the patriarch Vito Corleone (Brando), focusing on the transformation of Michael Corleone (Pacino) from reluctant family outsider to ruthless mafia boss.

Paramount Pictures obtained the rights to the novel for the price of $80,000, before it gained popularity. Studio executives had trouble finding a director; their first few candidates turned down the position. They and Coppola disagreed over who would play several characters, in particular, Vito and Michael. Filming took place on location, primarily around New York and in Sicily, and was completed ahead of schedule. The musical score was principally composed by Nino Rota, with additional pieces by Carmine Coppola.

The film was the highest-grossing film of 1972 and was for a time the highest-grossing film ever made. It won the Oscars for Best Picture, Best Actor (Brando) and Best Adapted Screenplay (for Puzo and Coppola). Its seven other Oscar nominations included Pacino, James Caan, Robert Duvall (Best Supporting Actor), and Coppola for Best Director.

The Godfather is widely regarded as one of the greatest films in world cinema and one of the most influential, especially in the gangster genre. It was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 1990, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" and is ranked the second-greatest film in American cinema (behind Citizen Kane) by the American Film Institute. It was followed by sequels The Godfather Part II (1974) and The Godfather Part III (1990).
 

Nino Rota - The Godfather 1/2
Taipei Symphony Orchestra -
direttore: Stefano Mazzoleni

Nino Rota - The Godfather 2/2
Taipei Symphony Orchestra -
direttore: Stefano Mazzoleni

The Godfather - Bonasera 1/10  (1972)

The Godfather - Johnny Fontane Scene 2/10  (1972)

The Godfather - Horse's Head 3/10 (1972) 

The Godfather - Sollozzo Known As The Turk 4/10 (1972)

The Godfather - Luca Brasi Sleeps With The Fishes 5/10  (1972)

The Godfather - Don Corleone Shooting 6/10  (1972)

The Godfather - Michael Shoots Sollozzo & McCluskey 7/10  (1972)

The Godfather - Sonny Is Brutally Murdered 8/10  (1972)

The Godfather - I'm Moe Greene 9/10 (1972) 

The Godfather - Michael Settles All Family Business 10/10  (1972)

The Godfather Part II

The Godfather Part II is a 1974 American crime film produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a screenplay co-written with Mario Puzo, starring Al Pacino and Robert De Niro. Partially based on Puzo's 1969 novel The Godfather, the film is both sequel and prequel to The Godfather, presenting parallel dramas: one picks up the 1958 story of Michael Corleone (Pacino), the new Don of the Corleone crime family, protecting the family business in the aftermath of an attempt on his life; the prequel covers the journey of his father, Vito Corleone (De Niro), from his Sicilian childhood to the founding of his family enterprise in New York City.

The Godfather Part II opened to divided reviews from critics. Its reputation, however, improved rapidly and it soon became the subject of critical reevaluation. It was nominated for eleven Academy Awards, and became the first sequel to win for Best Picture. Its six Oscar wins included Best Director for Coppola, Best Supporting Actor for De Niro and Best Adapted Screenplay for Coppola and Puzo. Pacino won the BAFTA Award for Best Actor and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Both The Godfather Part II and its predecessor remain highly influential films, especially in the gangster genre, and the former has been reevaluated. In 1997, the American Film Institute ranked it as the 32nd-greatest film in American film history and it retained this position 10 years later. Some have deemed it superior to the 1972 original. It was selected for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 1993, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

The Godfather Part III, a further sequel, was released in 1990.
 

Nino Rota - The Godfather Part II - Soundtrack Suite 

Nino Rota Main Title - The Immigrant - The Godfather Part II

The Godfather: Part 2 (1/8) - My Offer is Nothing (1974)

The Godfather: Part 2 (2/8) - The Murder of Don Fanucci (1974)

The Godfather: Part 2 (3/8) - You're Nothing to Me Now (1974)

The Godfather: Part 2 (4/8) - It Was an Abortion (1974) 

The Godfather: Part 2 (5/8) - Sicilian Revenge (1974)

If History Has Taught Us Anything - The Godfather: Part 2 (6/8) (1974)

The Godfather: Part 2 (7/8) - Fredo's Death (1974) 

The Godfather: Part 2 (8/8) - Corleone Family Flashback (1974) 

The Godfather Part II - Trailer

"The Godfather 2" Best Scene 

The Godfather Part III
 

The Godfather Part III is a 1990 American crime film written by Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola, and directed by Coppola. A sequel to The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather Part II (1974), it completes the story of Michael Corleone, a Mafia kingpin who attempts to legitimize his criminal empire. The film also includes fictionalized accounts of two real-life events: the 1978 death of Pope John Paul I and the Papal banking scandal of 1981–82, both linked to Michael Corleone's business affairs. The film stars Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire, and Andy García, and features Eli Wallach, Joe Mantegna, George Hamilton, Bridget Fonda, and Sofia Coppola. Music by  Carmine Coppola.

Coppola and Puzo preferred the title The Death of Michael Corleone, but Paramount Pictures found that unacceptable. Coppola stated that The Godfather series is two films and that The Godfather Part III is an epilogue. It received generally positive reviews, albeit less than the critical acclaim that the first two films received. It grossed $136,766,062 and was nominated for seven Academy Awards including the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Nino Rota - The Godfather Part III - Vincent's Theme

The Godfather Intermezzo (The Godfather Part III)---Nino Rota & Carmine Coppola

The Godfather: Part 3 (1/10) - I Dread You (1990) 

The Godfather: Part 3 (2/10) - All Bastards Are Liars (1990)

The Godfather: Part 3 (3/10) - Two Assassins, One Gun (1990) 

The Godfather: Part 3 (4/10) - Joey Zasa Gets No Respect (1990) 

The Godfather: Part 3 (5/10) - Helicopter Hit (1990) 

Just When I Thought I Was Out, They Pull Me Back In! SCENE - The Godfather: Part 3 (1990)

The Godfather: Part 3 (7/10) - I Killed My Father's Son (1990)

The Godfather: Part 3 (8/10) - Michael Apologizes to Kay (1990) 

The Godfather: Part 3 (9/10) - I Always Loved You (1990) 

Mary is Hit - The Godfather: Part 3 (10/10) Movie CLIP (1990)

The family portrait in "The Godfather: Part III"

Godfather Sicilian Song

Our Facebook Page

  • Facebook - Black Circle

© 2017 music-world.org

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now